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Tomato Chutney

An easy tomato chutney that's perfect served with cheese, cold or hot meats or just on a cracker.
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tomato chutney on cracker.

Tomato Chutney isn’t just the thing our mums or nanas made. It’s a delicious addition which turns a meal or snack into something special. And this quick Tomato Chutney Recipe gives you everything you need to easily create your own version of this tasty and versatile condiment.

tomato chutney

What is chutney?

Chutney is an idea our mums and nanas borrowed from India, and is now a popular condiment (and way of preserving food) throughout the world.

It’s a chunky spread that’s cooked up with chopped fruits, vinegar, spices and sugar.

Chutney vs relish

Chutney and relish are both condiments and often have similar ingredients. It’s not easy to come up with a general rule to distinguish the two, however chutneys are often chunkier and cooked longer compared to relish.

Ingredients for Tomato Chutney

This Tomato Onion Chutney recipe requires 1 kg of tomatoes and produces about 750ml of chutney.

Got more tomatoes you want to transform?

Just double, triple or multiply the quantities according to your wishes.

Or, check out my collection of tomato recipes here.

So, apart from the tomatoes, you’ll also need:

  • apples
  • onions
  • brown sugar
  • garlic clove
  • ginger
  • chilli powder
  • salt
  • cloves
  • cider vinegar.
tomato chutney ingredients

You may also need to add a teaspoon of cornflour, mixed with a little extra vinegar, at the end to thicken the chutney.

How to make Tomato Chutney

There’s no resting period required for this Easy Tomato Chutney recipe, so you can have a jar of tomato chutney ready to go in less than a couple of hours.

Start by roughly chopping the tomatoes and onions.

Next, peel and core the apples and roughly chop those.

Aim for pieces 1-2cm by 1-2cm.

Now, place all the ingredients (except cornflour) in a large saucepan and heat gently until the sugar dissolves.

Once the sugar is dissolved, increase the heat until the mixture starts to boil.

Boil gently, uncovered and stirring occasionally, for approximately 1 hour and 15 minutes or until most of the liquid has evaporated and you’re left with a thick sauce.

If the mixture hasn’t thickened enough, add enough extra vinegar to one teaspoon of cornflour to reach a runny paste consistency. Add to the chutney and continue to boil for another 1-2 minutes or until mixture is thick and glossy.

Pour hot Tomato Chutney mixture into sterilised jars and seal immediately.

jar of tomato chutney

How can I tell if my chutney is ready?

Chutney is a nice, thick condiment and there should be no runny liquid on the surface of the mixture once it’s been cooked enough.

Some people suggest dragging a wooden spoon through the mixture as a test. If you can see a nice clear line on the bottom of the pot, it’s ready.

You need to take care that you also don’t over-do your chutney and burn it.

I recommend staying safe by adding the cornflour/vinegar mixture to thicken it up towards the end and avoid burning the chutney.

Storing Tomato Chutney

The amount of time your chutney will last depends on how well you sterilised the jars, how well you seal the jars and whether the jar is stored in a cool, dark place, the fridge or somewhere else.

There are many ways of doing all of these things, and I’m not going to cover them here as there is a tonne of information out there already.

I go for a very simple method that still means I can store my chutney in the pantry for a few months, at least, and for another month or more once opened in the fridge.

I sterilise my jars and lids simply by placing on a hot setting in the dishwasher.

I pour the hot mixture into the jar and seal immediately using a fresh, clean, plastic-lined twist on lid – making sure it’s on tightly. 

I don’t bother with the water bath step as this chutney has plenty of sugar and vinegar to act as a preserving agent.

Uses for Tomato Chutney

There are so many ways to enjoy tomato chutney!

Here are a few ideas to get you started:

  • Make a ham, cheese and tomato chutney sandwich
  • Add it to a burger
  • Enjoy it with a meat pie
  • Serve it with pate and cheese
  • Add a little to the mix when making homemade sausage rolls.
  • Cook a juicy steak and top it with chutney.
what is tomto chutney used for
tomato chutney on cracker.

Tomato Chutney

An easy tomato chutney that's perfect served with cheese, cold or hot meats or just on a cracker.
4.67 from 3 votes
Print Pin Rate
Course: Condiment
Cuisine: Australian, British
Keyword: Tomato Chutney
Prep Time: 10 minutes
Cook Time: 1 hour 15 minutes
Total Time: 1 hour 25 minutes
Servings: 15 servings
Calories: 122kcal

Equipment

  • sterilised jars (recipe makes about 750ml of chutney)

Ingredients

  • 1 kg tomatoes
  • 3 small apples (or 2 medium-sized)
  • 2 medium onions
  • 1 1/2 cups brown sugar
  • 1 garlic clove, finely grated
  • 1 small piece ginger (roughly double size of garlic clove), finely grated (or 1/4 teaspoon ground ginger powder)
  • 1/4 teaspoon chilli powder
  • 1 teaspoon salt
  • 1 teaspoon whole cloves (or 1/4 teaspoon ground cloves)
  • 1 cup cider vinegar
  • 1 teaspoon cornflour (plus enough extra vinegar to make a runny paste) – if required to thicken chutney

Instructions

  • Roughly chop tomatoes and onions.
  • Peel and core apples and roughly chop.
  • Place all ingredients (except cornflour) in a large saucepan and heat gently until sugar dissolves.
  • Increase heat until mixture starts to boil and boil gently, uncovered and stirring occasionally, for approximately 1 hour and 15 minutes or until most of the liquid has evaporated.
  • Add enough extra vinegar to the cornflour to reach a runny paste consistency. Add to the chutney and continue to boil for another 1-2 minutes or until mixture is thicker and glossy.
  • Pour hot mixture into sterilised jars and seal immediately.

Video

Notes

  1. Got more tomatoes you want to transform? Just double, triple or multiply the quantities according to your wishes. Or, check out my collection of tomato recipes under the “Collections” tab on the website cookingwithnanaling.com.
  2. For best results, chop your main ingredients evenly – about 1-2cm by 1-2cm.
  3. Is your chutney cooked enough? There should be no runny liquid on the surface of the mixture once it’s been cooked. Some people suggest dragging a wooden spoon through the mixture as a test. If you can see a nice clear line on the bottom of the pot, it’s ready.
  4. Take care not to burn the chutney. I recommend staying safe by adding the cornflour/vinegar mixture to thicken it up towards the end and avoid burning the chutney.
  5. Use sterilised jars. I sterilise my jars and lids simply by placing on a hot setting in the dishwasher.
  6. Pour the hot mixture into the jar and seal immediately using a fresh, clean, plastic-lined twist on lid – making sure it’s on tightly. 
  7. Store your chutney in a cool, dry place and, once opened, in the fridge for up to one month. The amount of time your chutney will last depends on how well you sterilised the jars, how well you seal the jars and whether the jar is stored in a cool, dark place, the fridge or somewhere else.
  8. Enjoy your chutney in so many ways!
  • Make a ham, cheese and tomato chutney sandwich
  • Add it to a burger
  • Enjoy it with a meat pie
  • Serve it with pate and cheese
  • Add a little to the mix when making homemade sausage rolls.
  • Cook a juicy steak and top it with chutney.

Nutrition

Calories: 122kcal | Carbohydrates: 30g | Protein: 1g | Fat: 0.2g | Saturated Fat: 0.04g | Polyunsaturated Fat: 0.1g | Monounsaturated Fat: 0.03g | Sodium: 167mg | Potassium: 256mg | Fiber: 2g | Sugar: 27g | Vitamin A: 582IU | Vitamin C: 12mg | Calcium: 32mg | Iron: 0.5mg
Recipe Rating




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